An exploration of how Josey De Rossi is seeking to reinvent her drama textbook to benefit from the relationship between specialist and generic capabilities, especially with regards to ‘enterprise skills’.

Languages for Computers and for People

This blog is part of my reviewing of Seymour Papert’s Mindstorms (1980). The challenge Papert sets himself is understanding why, in ‘rational’ cultures thinking is imagined as impeding actions, and even learning (95).  To examine this view, he draws on arguments about ‘computer cultures’; ‘mathophobia’ as symptomatic of learning in dissociated ways and on the benefits of…

Reading Mindstorms

Introduction: Computers For Children Seymour Papert’s introductory chapter sets out a visionary treatise that views the use of the computer in education as a ‘teaching machine’ (3).  This synopsis of the chapter focuses on Papert’s attempt to create a coherent educational process, informed by his idiosyncratic experience of playing with gears as a two-year-old. Viewed…

Where Are We Going With Drama in the Primary Classroom?

The whole school plan presented by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority shows how the primary school curriculum still provides Visual and Performing Arts through specialist instruction. However, are surrounded by literally thousands of articles, blogs and dozens of reports and books on that advocate accessing Drama and The Arts for every primary student in every Australian school through generalist teachers become more arts aware.  How should this come about? In this blog, I look at the important work of Professor Robyn Ewing and ask will her vision of an unrealised arts education potential ever be realised in the current climate in which we are re-defining the relationship between generalist and specialist in more than the Arts in primary schools.